South Carolina Arts Commission

South Carolina Arts Commission

Art In Sight

Art in Sight is designed to promote awareness of the opportunities for South Carolinians to enjoy the State Art Collection in their communities.

State Art Collection "Art In Sight" logo.Then-Chairman Bud Ferillo of the South Carolina Arts Commission conceived of Art in Sight. “The State Art Collection is a gem as dynamic and diverse as the span of history it represents. It’s one of our most valuable cultural assets and chronicles the history of art development in South Carolina.” A campaign and logo (right) were unveiled in 2009.

The State Art Collection has grown to include 466 works in a variety of media and styles by 288 artists. Over its 50-plus-year history, the collection has been featured in numerous exhibitions across the state, nation, and even internationally.

Ferillo believed that the State Art Collection has something that will appeal to everyone. “It includes everything from paintings and sculpture to baskets, fiber and Catawba pottery. It includes film, photography, installations and graphics—all by artists who live or have lived in South Carolina.”

Image shown: Gina Gilmour| Rescue | 1985 | oil on canvas | 52″ x 52″ (triptych, each panel)


Where You Can See It

The Commission board of directors and our partners at the S.C. Arts Foundation want to provide more opportunities for South Carolinians to enjoy the State Art Collection in their communities. Although works from the collection are loaned to art museums, state agencies, and public and private organizations, many organizations are unaware that the collection is available for displays and exhibitions.

“We want to get the word out. The collection belongs to the people of our state, and we want them to have a chance to see the art work in their own backyards,” Ferillo said.

Selections may currently be viewed at the following state agencies:
  • South Carolina Arts Commission (1026 Sumter St., Suite 200, Columbia)
  • Administrative Law Court (Edgar A. Brown Building, 1205 Pendleton St., Columbia)
  • Division of Technology Operations Data Center (4430 Broad River Rd., Columbia)
  • Forestry Commission (55 Broad River Rd., Columbia)
  • House of Representatives (Solomon Blatt Building, 1105 Pendleton St., Columbia)
  • Human Affairs Commission (1026 Sumter St., Columbia)
  • UofSC Institute for Mind & Brain (UofSC, 1800 Gervais St., Columbia)
  • Medical University of South Carolina (3 Radcliff Place, Charleston)
  • Revenue & Fiscal Accountability (Rembert Dennis Building, 1000 Assembly St., Columbia)
  • SCETV (1041 George Rogers Blvd., Columbia)
  • Technical College of the Lowcountry (New River Campus, 100 Community College Dr., Bluffton)
And at these regional partners:
  • South Arts (1800 Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta, GA)
  • Central Carolina Community Foundation (2142 Boyce St., 4th floor, Columbia)

Organizations and businesses interested in hosting an exhibition or displaying works from the collection should contact Harriett Green at 803.734.8696. Two ready-made exhibitions are available for travel: Contemporary Conversations and The African American Voice.

Past Major Exhibitions

With works by African American artists who are among the state’s best-known and widely celebrated practitioners, The African American Voice includes 40 pieces of artwork from the State Art Collection by 25 African American artists, including outsider artists Sam Doyle, Leroy Marshall, Richard Burnside and Dan Robert Miller, and academically trained artists with established careers such as Leo Twiggs, Arthur Rose, Tarleton Blackwell, MacArthur Goodwin, Jesse Guinyard, Joseph Gandy, Terry K. Hunter, Larry Jordan, Larry Lebby, Robert Spencer, and Winston Wingo. The sweetgrass basket tradition is represented by Mary Jackson, the best known practitioner working in this craft, and by Linda Blake, Marguerite Middleton, and Elizabeth Kinlaw. Artists such as Merton Simpson, Beverly Buchanan, Sheri Moore Change, Maxwell Taylor and Connie Floyd are all South Carolina—connected artists who no longer reside in the state.

The exhibition was created in response to the continued requests for works by African American artists from the State Art Collection.

Exhibition size will vary slightly from locale to locale depending on space. Contact Harriett Green (803.734.8696) for more information about being host of the exhibition.

Download a detailed list of the complete exhibition here.

A re-imagined Volkswagen engine, a mousetrap with an egg, a kimono cabinet, a life-size marionette-like figure and a modern day Annunciation scene illustrate an array of works found in Pig Tales, Blackberry Winter, and the Cabinet of Curiosities.

These works and others were assembled for the 150th Anniversary of the South Carolina State Fair. Artists who exhibited in the State Fair’s annual exhibition dating back to the early 1960’s, works that reflect aspects of fair culture, and some iconic pieces from the State Art Collection were featured in the Rosewoods Building.

Download a detailed list of the complete exhibition here.